Reviews

"Beautiful and exceptional picture book."
                            -  KATHY BLOOMFIELD, ASSOCIATION OF JEWISH LIBRARIES MONTHLY JOURNAL

 

" Valuable and inspiring."     - KIRKUS   

"Gottesfeld's compelling telling is supplemented by comprehensive notes. Witanto's illustrations richly render the story."     PUBLISHER'S WEEKLY     

 

"Gor­don is a hero unfa­mil­iar to most Amer­i­can read­ers who now have the oppor­tu­ni­ty to learn about her extra­or­di­nary life in an ele­gant­ly designed children’s book....Highly recommended."

                                                                                -EMILY SCHNEIDER, JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL REVIEW

 

" The text is written for younger children, but it serves as a great example to older students of the difference one individual can make."      - SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

"The unlikely story of a Jewish woman named Beate Sirota (considered a hero in Japan, yet hardly known by Americans) is told well."     - LISA SILVERMAN, JEWISH JOURNAL

"No Steps Behind: Beate Sirota Gordon’s Battle for Women’s Rights in Japan certainly meets the criteria for consideration for the Sydney Taylor Book Award. It offers an historically important and little known story of a young Jewish woman in Japan who, without understatement, changed the world, all while being beautifully written and illustrated for its intended audience, readers ages 7 – 12."
                                                                            - MEG WIVIOTT, THE SYDNEY TAYLOR SHMOOZE BLOG

"Haunting and deeply affecting, this take on Anne Frank's iconic story will be one readers won't easily forget."    -BOOKLIST 
 

"[An] achingly poignant picture book, poetically written." - SAM JULIANO, WONDERS IN THE DARK BLOG

"A noteworthy and highly recommended introduction to a difficult and significant topic."                                                                                                                                           SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

"Beautifully written, magnificently illustrated."  -SAN DIEGO JEWISH WORLD

"Writing with quiet lyricism, Gottesfeld portrays the tree as never understanding why the family has to stay inside, or the forces that swept them away, which makes it a poignant surrogate for readers who themselves coming to grips with what happened to Anne and all the Jews who perished in the Holocaust                 -PUBLISHERS WEEKLY